After Trump’s repeal of DACA, UMD offers resources for those affected

 People march in the streets of Los Angeles calling for the end of surveillance, deportations and criminalization of undocumented people.  Photo  by Molly Adams

People march in the streets of Los Angeles calling for the end of surveillance, deportations and criminalization of undocumented people. Photo by Molly Adams

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, came into the limelight after President Donald Trump called for an end the Obama-era program in September.

Over 800,000 recipients who were brought to the country as children illegally will now have to file for renewal or will be targeted for deportation. The program gives recipients, also known as Dreamers, legal right to work without fear of being removed from the country.

In the University of Minnesota system, there are a handful of students who are Dreamers and are fearful of being targeted for deportation upon speaking out. Professor Ryan Goei is fearful for his students who may be affected by the end of DACA.

“You can’t argue that it’s humane for our country,” Goei said. “I can’t even fathom it.”

For Dreamers whose DACA status expires on March 5, 2018, a renewal application must be given to the US Citizenship and Immigration Services by Oct. 5.

Director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion Susana Pelayo-Woodward says there are many resources at UMD for students who may be dreamers. She is also hoping students come to her if they need help.

“They can contact me as a resource person,” said Woodward.

University of Minnesota President Eric Kaler issued a statement to the schools that he was disappointed in the decision that was made by President Trump. Kaler encourages students who may be affected to contact the campus’s immigration response team.

“I will personally monitor this situation carefully and ensure that the resources needed to care for DACA students are available,” Kaler said in the statement.

Chancellor Black also expressed his disappointment in the decision in his statement.

“I have joined other Chancellors and Presidents across the country in expressing the importance of this program, including having signed on to the American Council on Education's letter of support,” Black said in his statement.

The UMN website has a specific page for dreamers that includes many resources. Dreamers can also contact the Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota through a DACA Renewal FAQ listed on their website. United We Dream’s campaign #heretostay also has a "Five things you need to know about DACA" article for those with questions.

 

NewsSamantha Church