5K Run and Walk funds cancer research

Illustration by Rebecca Kottke

Illustration by Rebecca Kottke

This Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018, a 5K Run and Walk at Bagley Nature Center, will donate 100 percent of their proceeds to funding cancer research at the Masonic Cancer Center.

This 5K Run and Walk, hosted by the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus and College of Pharmacy, will take place, “rain or shine” at 5:30 p.m. for participants and 6 p.m. for the general public. This event also has an entrance fee of $10.

The medical school on campus and the College of Pharmacy partnered with Chainbreaker 2018 for this Run and Walk. Regional Campus Dean for the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus Paula Termuhlen is the team captain for these efforts regarding Chainbreaker.

Regional Campus Dean for the Medical School, Paula Termuhlen, with her husband at the Chainbreaker Ride on Aug. 12, 2018. Termuhlen rode her bike 25 miles for the Chainbreaker Ride to raise money for cancer research. Photo courtesy of Paula Termuhlen

Regional Campus Dean for the Medical School, Paula Termuhlen, with her husband at the Chainbreaker Ride on Aug. 12, 2018. Termuhlen rode her bike 25 miles for the Chainbreaker Ride to raise money for cancer research. Photo courtesy of Paula Termuhlen

“Chainbreaker is an event held by the University of Minnesota to raise money for cancer research,” Termuhlen said.

According to Termuhlen, a group of faculty, students, staff, and friends of the University of Minnesota Medical School and College of Pharmacy, called the AHC North Peloton Team, recently partnered with Chainbreaker.

On Aug. 12, 2018, the AHC North Peloton Team made $17,000 by cycling a combined 600 miles for the Chainbreaker Ride, according to Termuhlen.

“This is our first year for the 5K,” Termuhlen said. “We’re super excited. We’re hoping to make this an annual event.”

Running and walking are not the only things happening, however. A scavenger hunt for kids will also be taking place, along with a meal including hot dogs for an additional $5.

According to Termuhlen, UMD “has been great.” The school donated all the hotdogs for the event.

Termuhlen believes that events like this are important for the community.

“Almost everybody has a personal connection to cancer,” Termuhlen said. “Some people in our group have had cancer.”

Professor in the College of Pharmacy, David Stenehjem, at the finish line for the Chainbreaker Ride on Aug. 12, 2018. Stenehjem rode all 180 miles on his bike for the Chainbreaker Ride for one of his many cancer fundraising events. Photo courtesy of David Stenehjem

Professor in the College of Pharmacy, David Stenehjem, at the finish line for the Chainbreaker Ride on Aug. 12, 2018. Stenehjem rode all 180 miles on his bike for the Chainbreaker Ride for one of his many cancer fundraising events. Photo courtesy of David Stenehjem

Another person involved with organizing this event is Professor David Stenehjem for the College of Pharmacy. Stenehjem was also involved with the Chainbreaker Ride and his work focuses on cancer.

“This event seems perfect for me,” Stenehjem said. “Riding bike and working to fight cancer.”

Due to his connection to the 5K Run and Walk, he is excited for the community to get involved.

“We really didn’t know what to expect,” Stenehjem said. “We’re all really happy with the number of people who signed up and who will show on the day of the event, and we’re excited for the community to come out and support the AHC North Peloton Team.”

According to Alyssa Dindorf, Communications Specialist at the Medical School, 84 people have signed up as of Wednesday morning Sept. 5, 2018.

“When we were planning the event, we were hoping for maybe 20 to 30 people,” Dindorf said. “So, to [have] 84 people and counting signed up is amazing and is more than we expected.”

The people signed up for the event are not just associated with the College of Pharmacy or the Medical School, however. Currently registered for the event are people from the outside community, faculty, parents, medical students, and undergrads from UMD, according to Dindorf.

This 5K Run and Walk is part of a “collective mission to understand cancer better and improve treatments,” Dindorf concluded.